EJB Talks Logo

MACH Interim Administrative Director Jeanne Herb on EJB Talks

Jeanne Herb was recently featured on the Rutgers University Edward J Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy's Podcast EJB Talks, where she provides an overview of the Bloustein School's Environmental Analysis and Communications Group (EAC) as well as the Megalopolitan Coastal Transformation Hub (MACH).

Listen Here
Image

Risks from rising seas, shifting storms, eroding coastlines, changing ecosystems and development patterns, are escalating in heavily populated coastal communities around the world. The decisions that are made today to address these hazards, whether by federal, state or local governments, community-led efforts, or individual households, will shape risks for decades to come.

Beach Replenishment, Monmouth Beach, NJ. John Gattuso

Current frameworks for addressing long-term, multidecadal coastal climate risks are limited in their ability to offer climate adaptation pathways in light of deep uncertainty about climate futures, development patterns, changing coastlines and the priorities of residents, decision-makers and leaders.  The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Coastlines and People Program (CoPE) supports innovative, multi-institution initiatives that broaden participation with communities and decision-makers to build coastal climate adaptation frameworks that transform understanding of interactions among natural, human-built, and social systems in coastal, populated environments.

The CoPe Megalopolitan Coastal Transformation Hub (MACH) aims to develop a climate-resilient decision-making framework to equitably support coastal communities. MACH brings together natural scientists, social scientists, civil engineers and humanists with coastal stakeholders and decision-makers to co-produce knowledge that can inform flexible climate adaptation pathways in coastal communities. Grounded in the greater New York City, Philadelphia and New Jersey region, MACH is a collaborative effort of 11 academic institutions, led by Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.  MACH is designed to address fundamental research questions that are critical to produce replicable models for management of coastal climate risk recognizing the deep uncertainties associated with long-term, multi-decadal risk planning.  With a strong commitment to co-production of knowledge and justice, equity, diversity and inclusion, MACH is advised by two bodies: a diverse Collaborative Stakeholder Advisory Panel comprised of community leaders; state, federal and local government agencies, and experts from non-profit organizations; and an Executive Advisory Board comprised of researchers with strong expertise in building multi-institution research endeavors.  Additionally, MACH seeks to broaden participation efforts through engagement of community college students and faculty in the development of research priorities, activities and outcomes.  The Hub seeks to involve students in MACH academic institutions and community colleges to support service learning opportunities.

Aerial view of the Jersey Shore. Photo by Matt Drews

Risks from rising seas, shifting storms, eroding coastlines, changing ecosystems and development patterns, are escalating in heavily populated coastal communities around the world. The decisions that are made today to address these hazards, whether by federal, state or local governments, community-led efforts, or individual households, will shape risks for decades to come.

Current frameworks for addressing long-term, multidecadal coastal climate risks are limited in their ability to offer climate adaptation pathways in light of deep uncertainty about climate futures, development patterns, changing coastlines and the priorities of residents, decision-makers and leaders.  The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Coastlines and People Program (CoPE) supports innovative, multi-institution initiatives that broaden participation with communities and decision-makers to build coastal climate adaptation frameworks that transform understanding of interactions among natural, human-built, and social systems in coastal, populated environments.

The CoPe Megalopolitan Coastal Transformation Hub (MACH) aims to develop a climate-resilient decision-making framework to equitably support coastal communities. MACH brings together natural scientists, social scientists, civil engineers and humanists with coastal stakeholders and decision-makers to co-produce knowledge that can inform flexible climate adaptation pathways in coastal communities. Grounded in the greater New York City, Philadelphia and New Jersey region, MACH is a collaborative effort of 11 academic institutions, led by Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.  MACH is designed to address fundamental research questions that are critical to produce replicable models for management of coastal climate risk recognizing the deep uncertainties associated with long-term, multi-decadal risk planning.  With a strong commitment to co-production of knowledge and justice, equity, diversity and inclusion, MACH is advised by two bodies: a diverse Collaborative Stakeholder Advisory Panel comprised of community leaders; state, federal and local government agencies, and experts from non-profit organizations; and an Executive Advisory Board comprised of researchers with strong expertise in building multi-institution research endeavors.  Additionally, MACH seeks to broaden participation efforts through engagement of community college students and faculty in the development of research priorities, activities and outcomes.  The Hub seeks to involve students in MACH academic institutions and community colleges to support service learning opportunities.

How can an improved scientific understanding of the integrated natural-human-decision system inform coastal climate risk management and the design of mission-oriented basic research?
How do the dynamics of coastal natural-human systems drive hazards and risks?
How do dynamic interactions among decisions affecting the coastal system at different scales and time horizons influence exposures, vulnerabilities, and risks?
Image

A Headline

Dui nunc mattis enim ut tellus elementum sagittis vitae. Justo donec enim diam vulputate ut pharetra sit. Nam aliquam sem et tortor consequat. Nisl nisi scelerisque eu ultrices. Hendrerit dolor magna eget est lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Massa placerat duis ultricies lacus sed turpis tincidunt. Maecenas accumsan lacus vel facilisis volutpat est. Tellus cras adipiscing enim eu turpis. Sapien et ligula ullamcorper malesuada. Ipsum faucibus vitae aliquet nec ullamcorper sit amet. Faucibus purus in massa tempor nec feugiat nisl pretium fusce. Turpis egestas maecenas pharetra convallis posuere morbi. Eget lorem dolor sed viverra.
Learn More
Image

B Headline

Non nisi est sit amet facilisis magna etiam tempor orci. Purus viverra accumsan in nisl nisi. Arcu cursus vitae congue mauris rhoncus aenean vel elit. Leo duis ut diam quam nulla porttitor massa. Amet massa vitae tortor condimentum lacinia. Sem et tortor consequat id porta. Consectetur adipiscing elit duis tristique sollicitudin nibh sit. Eget mi proin sed libero enim. Arcu dictum varius duis at. Velit egestas dui id ornare arcu. Ac tincidunt vitae semper quis lectus nulla at volutpat.
Read More
example image

C Headline

Dui nunc mattis enim ut tellus elementum sagittis vitae. Justo donec enim diam vulputate ut pharetra sit. Nam aliquam sem et tortor consequat. Nisl nisi scelerisque eu ultrices. Hendrerit dolor magna eget est lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Massa placerat duis ultricies lacus sed turpis tincidunt. Maecenas accumsan lacus vel facilisis volutpat est. Tellus cras adipiscing enim eu turpis. Sapien et ligula ullamcorper malesuada. Ipsum faucibus vitae aliquet nec ullamcorper sit amet. Faucibus purus in massa tempor nec feugiat nisl pretium fusce. Turpis egestas maecenas pharetra convallis posuere morbi. Eget lorem dolor sed viverra.
Learn More

MACH Commitment to Justice, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

As a Hub with a focused mission to advance sustainable, science-informed climate adaptation pathways, MACH is committed to the authentic integration of justice, equity, diversity and inclusion into its practices.  A dominant criterion in MACH’s efforts is the prioritization of locations in which MACH’s engagement will lead to benefits for populations disproportionately affected by coastal climate change hazards.   This commitment is represented in the Principles of Engagement adopted by MACH in consultation with its Collaborative Stakeholder Advisory Panel.  These principles guide MACH’s engagement with stakeholders and communities as well as its research endeavor.
Principles of Engagement

MACH Partner Institutions

MACH Partner LogosMACH Partner Logos